Home About Robert Definitions Incident Report Psychology The Press Tips & Strategies Women
How Not To Hire A Bullying Boss

No one wants to hire a bully as a supervisor to abuse an employer’s human resources. Not when they could hire a professional who is trustworthy, on point, and leading his or her employees to productive ends instead. Making a bully-conscious hiring decision can be the difference between hiring a team leader or becoming known for having initiated an internal war. …

and more…
A Dozen Tips For Dealing With Bullies

Assisting an employee who seeks help after describing an abusive situation can be tricky. The HR professional must be able to distinguish a “bully” from an earnest but perhaps difficult or even troubled supervisor. In all honesty, the employee must be able to appreciate the difference between what might feel like “harassment” …It’s natural to assume that an allegedly abusive situation is ...a “bullying one” from...

and more…
International and Interdisciplinary Reviews
US Flag First, know that her bullying you is not personal. Lindsey Novak, Creators Syndicate's Workplace Reporter
New Zealand Flag
Previous books have explored the concept of workplace bullying, …however none have prepared the target for winning the battle with the bullying boss like “Bullying Bosses.” Diana Ayling, Senior Lecturer in Law, Unitec, New Zealand
Japan Flag
It is rare that a book of reference and self-help should read like an edge-of-the-seat John Grisham thriller. Sam Vaknin, PhD Author of “Malignant Self Love - Narcissism Revisited
UK Flag
It would also be a good reference text for HR professionals who are involved in resolving bullying. Personnel Today (the UK's premier HR magazine).
Canada Flag

Mueller acts as an ‘advocate’ for the abused, quickly arming them with the tools they need to defend themselves, and if push comes to shove, prove their case. Franke James, MFA, CEO WorkPolitics.com

UK Flag
Knowledge is power and this book provides just that. International Management Expert. Andrea Needham, Author of “Workplace Bullying, The Costly Business Secret.
US Flag
A "user-friendly" guide. Midwest Book Review ("Jobs/Careers Shelf").

$15.25 paperback, $9.99 Kindle

238 pages, fully indexed, dozens of charts and helpful exercises to help you clarify your circumstances.

Purchase on Amazon

 
Several Bullying Definitions
There are a great many definitions of a Bullying Boss and workplace abuse depending on the country and professional setting. Each country that has adopted protective measures (i.e. Australia, France, Norway, Quebec (Canada) and United Kingdom) has a different legal structure and definition. Within the psychoanalytic framework… civil lawsuit… workers’ compensation claim… anti-discrimination… laws. In the traditional labor-management framework… International Labor Organization (ILO) of the United Nations… European Commission… BBSG p. 26.
A Businesslike Definition
A Businesslike Definition Is Called For To facilitate managerial efforts to remedy bullying in the workplace prospectively, a business definition is called for rather than the constructs…
and more…
 

A Bullying Boss
Deviates from the employer’s designated mission and it’s practical applications,
Seemingly to pursue his/her own mission for power or control (a campaign, repeated events),
Over a subordinate employee
With behaviors understood to be anti-social, including all harassing behaviors regardless of motivation.

Moralists Shield Bullies
From a business perspective, “bullies” are not the well-intentioned supervisors who have perhaps “gone a little too far.” All of us dedicated to doing a good job are vulnerable to that fault. The difference with the bullies…
and more…
Are You Leader Or A Bully?
If you are reading this voluntarily and sincerely, you can relax. You’re not a Bully. If you’re someone who’s prone to workplace conflict upon occasion, you may need help…But that does not mean you seek to control others as a personal compulsion. That’s what Bullies do. Leaders are just the opposite. They “connect” with their charges rather than seek their “conquest” ……
and more…
The Varied Costs Of Bullying Bosses
Studies by occupational psychologists have shown that employees made to work under abusive circumstances reasonably avoid exposing themselves to hostilities.
As a matter of psychological self-defense, employees unconsciously and consciously withhold personal involvement generally, as well as specific work efforts they would otherwise provide.
They find escape through the otherwise unnecessary use of sick leave, unexcused absenteeism and workers’ compensation…
 

and more…

 

Robert On The Air
State Bar #103935
Board of Behavioral Sciences Provider #3232

 
Three Bullying Boss Myths
Myth #1 : Bullying is basically a dispute between a supervisor and a subordinate employee. …
and more…

Myth #2 : Bullying is an interpersonal dispute, making it difficult to understand...

and more…
Myth #3 : Myth #3: Bullying is about supervisory style, for example about how loud a particular supervisor might become. …
and more…
To Understand Bullying, Factor Out The Target
The first clue that these disturbances are not interpersonal disputes is that they make no sense on their own. On the contrary, they confound. But they do make sense when the scope of inquiry is enlarged to include the political dynamic within which the Bully is functioning. When it’s examined as a whole…
and more…
About Robert and His Inquiry

Robert Mueller, the Bullying Bosses Consultant is a former attorney who represented a couple thousand employees suffering adverse employer actions, many involving bullying. He came to know intimately, as adversaries, several Bulling Bosses on various sides of labor-management relations. He was made a Target by the Pros. He’s a Survivor.

and more…
Occupational Psychologists Are Baffled
But Bullying Isn’t Psychological. It’s Political Among the great many occupational psychologists studying workplace bullying, there are as many theories as there are business school scholars studying it. Science can’t explain bullying in psychological terms because it’s not psychological. It’s political. Bullies exploit their institutional power to “conquer” subordinates. See their overview of their efforts in their definitive compellation on workplace abuse on amazon.com (second half).

 

 
 
 
 
Copyright © 2007 Bullying Bosses: A Survivor’s Guide