Home About Robert Definitions Incident Report Psychology The Press Tips & Strategies Women

THREE BULLYING BOSS MYTHS

Myth :
Bullying is basically a dispute between a supervisor and a subordinate employee.
Fact :
Bullying Bosses exist in contradiction to the employer’s mission, its policies and procedures generally. They dedicate themselves to pursuing their own political mission as the higher calling. They are renegade supervisors who largely function covertly under management’s radar.
 
Personnel matters are only one example of where, through bullying, they circumvent management’s established procedures, thus cutting managers “out of the loop.” The employer’s interests go unrepresented. If a bullying allegation is made, there’s an excellent chance the alleged Bully has high-jacked some portion of operations.
   
   
 
Myth :
Bullying is an interpersonal dispute, making it difficult to understand.

Fact :
Bullying is political and not at all personal. It's a power struggle for the subjugation of a subordinate for reasons all the Bully's own. “The first clue that these disturbances are not interpersonal disputes is that they make no sense on their own. On the contrary, they confound. But they do make sense when the scope of inquiry is enlarged to include the larger dynamic within which the Bully is functioning. When examined as a whole, a quite different, non-personal, bullying-reality emerges…To aid the analysis, it helps to factor out Target employees altogether. The bullying is not in the least about them, except as victims…” [From the Survivor’s Guide Chapter Three, Definitions And Descriptions (To Understand Bullying, Factor Out The Target.]
 
Myth :
Bullying is about supervisory style, for example about how loud a particular supervisor might become.
Fact :
“It doesn’t matter so much how high a certain supervisor raised his or her voice on Wednesday. These other, non-bullying supervisors (bad, rough and tough supervisors) might be known to wrongfully raise their voices in frustration or anger, but they tend to be motivated by a concern to fulfill their organizational duties in pursuit of a legitimate business end. … By definition, if they have the capacity to connect with others earnestly, to learn lessons and grow from them, they are not Bullies. These others are criticized. Bullies are pathologized. What these others do may be bad, but what they do is not ‘about all them,’ it’s about the work itself.” [From the Survivor’s Guide Chapter Three, Definitions And Descriptions (It’s Not About Degree, It’s About Type).]
   

 

 

   

 

 
Copyright © 2007 Bullying Bosses: A Survivor’s Guide